Desk Doodle 2: Dragons and Dames

It’s the end of my class; I’ve just gotten done wrapping my mind around the concept of language among animals, contemplating whether or not the Waggle Dance that bees do is fascinating or adorable, and whether it’s a safe idea to teach primates sign language (real life Planet of the Apes anyone?!). I’m thinking about finals, and my near move to Seattle, and whether I should wear a casual dress or a nice skirt to the awards banquet I’m attending for my induction into Kappa Tau Alpha Honor Society, when I look over and see it: Desk Doodle 2.

desk doodleI immediately (and embarrassingly) whip out my camera, thinking once again about how amazing it is that people find the time to create pieces of art in an hour and forty-five minute class. It is a simple piece, but I think it has a sense of charm. The mystery artist seems to have a degree of comfort with their craft, because the lines are bold and sure, and the only smudging is done to add feeling below the dragon. I wonder even now how this drawing could have expanded, had the spiritless student been given a bit more time (I’m picturing castles, unicorns–you know, medieval stuff).  So I pose the question once again:

Is this art?

 

Brain picker: a few ART favorites

In light of my recent post on the definition of art, I wanted to highlight a few of my favorites from around the web. Much like the art I make, the art I enjoy varies, and the style depends strongly on my mood; that’s one of my favorite things about art though, it’s such a distinctly human entity, always capable of change. This list has been found and collected over the past few years, and every time I go back through it, I’m reminded of where I was in life, and how art helped me in a time that was truly rough. Therein lies the beauty of the depth and expression that is art. 

These are in no particular order, and are just a few of the many wonderful things I have come across over time.

  1. Minjae Lee is a young South Korean artist who combines illustration with paint to create moody, intense works that evoke wonder and emotion. The depth of color and grey reflects the dichotomies that make up the world. For me, the works are just plain stunning; I’m moved by the blacks, and uplifted by the wondrous colors. A great collaboration of her work can be found here.
  2. I found Brian Viveros longest ago, and even after a few years, the art still moves me. The darkness of the paintings couples with the dark content to form perfect tonality. The women are all mirror images, yet each one has a different history, different emotions and different surroundings, making each very unique and worth looking at. There is a sense of sadness that undertones each work, and I think at times, I am attracted to the pieces because I can so closely relate. His work is collected here.
  3. When it comes to watercolor, Marion Bolognesi is at the forefront in my mind. It’s not the immense detail that is used which stands out, but the haunting lack-thereof–The eery portrayal of only eyes, or eyes and a mouth, create a mystified and moving work, which easily looks into the viewer’s mind and being. Somehow, the lack of completion lends to the power in the pieces, and each time I view them, I am incited to a new depth of emotion and thought. A nice collaboration of work can be found here.
  4. Lastly is a really great collective page of a huge number of artists, each worth adoration in his own way. These works are largely surreal, which tends to be my style all around. It may take a few minutes to scroll through and appreciate them all, but it is absolutely worth every second of time. Some of them are adaptive of nature, some are interpretive of Star Wars and classic literature stories, and some are just plain quirky, fun, and weird (like me!).

These are the tip of the iceberg when it comes to my definition of art, but that’s a beautiful thing! The world is massive, and tastes, and inspirations are all different, and all dependent on where we are, who we are, and what we want to convey and become. Art is not only unique in itself, but is unique to each person making it and viewing it as well. We take away what we want, and then give it again in what we pass on to the world next. So I suppose you could say this is my art, and what I’m passing on is the consolation and inspiration I have found here before.

Desk Doodle–or–What is ART?

I sat down in my desk at school last week, fully ready and eager to give input on the discussion the class was about to have, when I was suddenly distracted; there was a doodle on my desk which–despite its lack of complexity and slight smudge from previous seat-occupants–was actually pretty good. I sat and admired, quickly snapping a picture before class began. As I half-listened to my professor talk about Frederick Douglass and the (not so) Civil War, I contemplated this little gem I had stumbled across;

Who had drawn this? How long had it taken? What was their inspiration? Was their class really that bad?

desk2

I spun over it, butterflies flapping away at my stomach as I rehearsed all of the fun things I could write about regarding this simple desk-doodle, when I stopped and pondered; was this really art? I write about art, and though there are a lot of things I myself would consider to be art (have you heard of eye bombing?!), I wondered if others’ opinions might not be so lax? After all, I had read an article a while back that stated that a four-year-old girl’s doodle paintings were art (and selling for $24,000 mind you! It’s okay, all other striving artists can just find the nearest bridge), so I couldn’t decide where the rest of the world stands.

The dictionary says this:

art

/ärt/

Noun
  1. The expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, typically in a visual form such as painting or sculpture,…: “the art of the Renaissance”
  2. Works produced by such skill and imagination.
Synonyms
craft – skill – artifice – science – workmanship – knack

What do YOU say?